This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful Being. And if the fixed stars are the centers of other like systems, these, being formed by the like wise counsel, must be all subject to the dominion of One…

This Being governs all things not as the soul of the world, but as Lord over all; and on account of his dominion he is wont to be called “Lord God” . . . or “Universal Ruler.” . . . It follows that the true God is a living, intelligent and powerful Being. . . he governs all things, and knows all things that are or can be done. . .  He endures forever… We reverence and adore him as his servants…

Blind metaphysical necessity, which is certainly the same always and everywhere, could produce no variety of things.  All that diversity of natural things which we find suited to different times and places could arise from nothing but the ideas and will of a Being necessarily existing. . .

And thus much concerning God, to discourse of whom from the appearances of things does certainly belong to Natural Philosophy.

Isaac Newton
Principia Mathematica

Sir Isaac Newton (1643 – 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian who is considered by many scholars and members of the general public to be one of the most influential people in human history.

His seminal work Principia mathematica (1687) is  widely regarded as one of the most important works of the Scientific Revolution.

Newton was also highly religious, though an unorthodox Christian, writing more on Biblical hermeneutics and occult studies than the natural science for which he is remembered today.